Southern California

Natural Vision Educator

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vision Tips
Resources
About Bates
A New Way of Seeing
 
 
 
 

The practices described here can help to relax tension and restore good vision: the secret is in finding what works for you. They were developed to help you regain an effortless sense of ease. If you don’t experience them as easy and relaxing; then please don’t continue. You’ll need further instruction or different techniques to try.

If you do enjoy them, great! Treating your eyes to favorable conditions of rest, movement and light begins the journey to better eyesight.

 

Palming

The Long Swing

Sunning

Blinking and Breathing

 

Palming

This is a technique to give your eyes deep rest.
 
  1. Sit down and place your elbows on the surface of a table. Use a pillow or some books to adjust the height, so that your back and neck are aligned and shoulders are relaxed. Get comfortable.
  2. Place the palms of your hands over your closed eyes in a cupped fashion. Eyelids should not touch the hands. Rest your fingers on your forehead, your lower palms at about the area of your cheekbones.
  3. Put no pressure at all on your cheekbones. Your hands will softly exclude as much light as possible.
  4. Use your imagination to follow your breath, to imagine total blackness, or to remember beautiful moving scenes, like waves crashing at a beach. Music can also be useful; it’s all about what makes you feel calm and expansive.

 

Effects:

This rests the optic nerve, which normally is very stimulated during our busy lives. It helps you recognize, and release, the stress in your eyes, neck, shoulders and face. As you do this regularly; the relaxation will become habitual.

(Note: People with some forms of glaucoma should not palm for extended periods.)

 

The Long Swing

 
  1. Stand with the feet hip width or wider, and relax the knees. Keeping the head in alignment with the spine, move the hips, chest and head together to the right, and then to the left, looking on a parallel plane. Go as far as is easy and comfortable. Lift one arm, and let your eyes look at your index finger on that hand as it swings along with the front of your face and chest. Observe how the background is swinging in the opposite direction.
  2. Let both arms hang down by your sides, and continue to swing back and forth. Allow the scenery to go by and enjoy the sense of movement.
  3. Allow the world to go by. Allow the perception of movement as it happens; without trying to ‘grab hold’ of anything you see.
Breathe, and Blink your eyes regularly. Swing your body easily and rhythmically. Do this for some minutes.

 

Effects:

Relaxes the whole visual system. The peripheral vision becomes more awake and engaged, while the central vision is stimulated to move more freely.

 

 

Sunning

Many of us live in artificial lighting, and wear sunglasses in sunlight, so the eyes become oversensitive, and less adept at using light properly.

Go outside before 10:00 or after 4:00pm, and stand facing the sun. Close your eyes and move your head and body from side to side. Just breath, relax, and allow the sunlight to nourish your closed eyes as you slowly turn back and forth.

Make this movement:
 
  1. Easy and flowing,
  2. Let yourself go a full 180 degrees if you can - or simply as far to either side as is comfortable.
  3. After doing this for several minutes, palm the eyes for a full minute, or more.

Effects:

This energizes the eyes, and will help to make them more resilient/responsive to sunlight.         

 

 

Blinking and Breathing

When concentrating on reading a book, working at the computer, driving, or watching a show on television, we often unconsciously stare and hold our breath. These habits are detrimental to the ease of good vision. When you find yourself having tired eyes, or eyestrain:

 
  1. Remember to blink easily and lightly more often.
  2. Remember to breath fully, smoothly and evenly.
 

 

Effects:

When we blink easily, softly, and frequently; it lubricates the eyes, breaks up the 'stare', and enables us to see better. Remembering to breathe fully oxygenates the eyes and brain, as well as the entire body. This enables you to see, and function at a higher level.